Scripts vs. Novels

Scott Myers discusses the difference between writing scripts and writing screenplays, and what to do when your more familiar with one but want to switch to the other. His answer: do both. He also discusses the challenges and advantages of each side of the writing spectrum.

Have thoughts about this or have additional insight on the subject? Feel free to comment and discuss in the comments 🙂

Read the full article here: Reader Question: What’s the biggest challenge novelists face when switching to screenwriting?

Graduate School Experiences

Teresa Warner discusses her experience with attending graduate film school and how it impacted her life. As a graduate film student myself, I can say that I agree with her and share her sentiment that I also found myself in graduate school. But I don’t want to spoil the article!

Read her full story here: STORY BROADS: What Graduate School Taught Me About Screenwriting, Hollywood, and Myself

6 Filmmaking Tips from Ben Wheatley

Christopher Campbell from Film School Rejects gathers and shares six pieces of filmmaking advice from British filmmaker Ben Wheatley. As creatives, we find inspiration from many people, places, events, and things. Here’s more insight into how one successful filmmaker gets work done. Use your inspiration wisely 🙂

Read the full article here: 6 Filmmaking Tips from Ben Wheatley

Is My Screenplay Terrible? Here’s How to Find Out

Lisa Waugh with ScreenwritingU offers writers insight on how to determine whether or not your screenplay is good. With wit and humor, she offers six guidelines to think about as you evaluate your work and prepare to release it into the wild as well as warnings as to what can happen if you share your work too soon.

Read the Full Article Here: How to Know If Your Script Doesn’t Suck

Helpful Infographics for Screenwriters

Screenwriting is an inspiring, creative, amazing profession with seemingly endless opportunities. However, it can be daunting, especially for the newcomers. There’s a lot to take into account when writing out your movie: the setting, the time period, the genre, which actors will play which characters. The movie business has a lot of moving parts, but unlike writing novels where the novel is the finished product, the screenplay is where the whole journey begins. And that process is often very long and arduous. Stephanie Palmer, author of Good In a Room, provides several infographics to help decipher the screenwriting and process and movie business.

Read the Full Article Here: Screenplay Writing Explained In 7 Infographics

SCRIPT HACKS: 3 Kick-Ass Methods To Fix A Broken Screenplay Scene

Have you been staring at your computer screen at the blank page as the cursor taunts you with your inability to make it move? Caught yourself doodling on the blank notebook page because the words just. won’t. come. out. Is there a scene you’ve already written but, let’s face it, it’s pure fertilizer. If you have something on the page, you are halfway there. Give yourself a big high five. Don’t worry. Help is on the way! Alex Bloom with Script Magazine offers three “script hacks” on how to fix a broken scene so you can finish the story successfully and be on your way to winning your Oscar.

Read the full article here: SCRIPT HACKS: 3 Kick-Ass Methods To Fix A Broken Screenplay Scene

Advice and Inspiration from Greta Gerwig

Ken Miyamoto shares some morsels of inspiration from the brilliant mind of Greta Gerwig, the writer and director of Lady Bird. He shares her insight through a series of interviews with the actress turn writer/director. Here are a few highlights:

  • Writing Words that Don’t Look Like They’ve Been Written
  • Taking the Time to Prepare Yourself
  • Story Structure Is Embedded Within Us All
  • You Have to Take the Leap
  • Don’t Judge and Dismiss Your Own Writing
  • Listen to Your Characters
  • Treat Each Character as If They Could Have Their Own Movie About Them
  • Great Screenplays Should Be Like Poetry

Read the full article here: Screenwriting Advice From LADY BIRD Writer/Director Greta Gerwig

Ten Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Every story is different and there are different ways of telling a story. Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft discusses ten different story structures that writers can use to structure their screenplays. Yes, sometimes chronological order works best and makes the most sense. Other times, a different approach proves to be more effective or allows the storyteller to be more creative. All successful stories have a structure to them, but by utilizing different methods of structure, writers can create a more visually fascinating and engaging for the audience.

Read full article here: 10 Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Thirteen Common Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Brad Schreiber discusses thirteen common mistakes that screenwriters make, offers insight on how writers can spot those mistakes and provides advice on how to fix them.

Read full article: https://www.writersstore.com/13-things-bad-screenwriters-commonly-do/

Uncomplicating Complicated Plots

Creating complicated stories doesn’t need to be complicated. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft breaks down complicated story plots and offers advice on the best way writers can create the complicated stories. He uses films such as “Pulp Fiction”, “Memento”, and “The Sixth Sense” to illustrate the discussion.

Read full article here: 7 Simple Ways to Craft Complicated Plots in Screenplays