Ten Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Every story is different and there are different ways of telling a story. Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft discusses ten different story structures that writers can use to structure their screenplays. Yes, sometimes chronological order works best and makes the most sense. Other times, a different approach proves to be more effective or allows the storyteller to be more creative. All successful stories have a structure to them, but by utilizing different methods of structure, writers can create a more visually fascinating and engaging for the audience.

Read full article here: 10 Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Thirteen Common Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Brad Schreiber discusses thirteen common mistakes that screenwriters make, offers insight on how writers can spot those mistakes and provides advice on how to fix them.

Read full article: https://www.writersstore.com/13-things-bad-screenwriters-commonly-do/

Uncomplicating Complicated Plots

Creating complicated stories doesn’t need to be complicated. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft breaks down complicated story plots and offers advice on the best way writers can create the complicated stories. He uses films such as “Pulp Fiction”, “Memento”, and “The Sixth Sense” to illustrate the discussion.

Read full article here: 7 Simple Ways to Craft Complicated Plots in Screenplays

What is Stream of Consciousness Writing?

Sarah Cool shares Overall Adventures insights on a thing called stream of consciousness writing. What it is is simply sitting down with a journal or at a computer and literally writing everything that comes through your head as it comes to you. They explain the benefits of using this technique of writing and how it can help you create the world you want in your head and on paper, but can also help you solve problems in your real world.

Full article and video here: Stream Of Consciousness Writing

Twelve Tips for Writers

Fun fact: writing is hard. Very hard. Sarah Cool shares a video from writing coach Stephanie Newell that discusses useful advice for writers. This is geared specifically towards prose and novel writers, but her advice is equally useful to screenwriters.

See full article with video here: 12 Tips For Every Writer

Screenwriters Final Draft Checklist

Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft provides a checklist for screenwriters to use to perfect the final drafts of their screenplays. Consider these guidelines for a well-polished and ready script for readers.

Click here for full article: The Ultimate Final Draft Checklist for Screenwriters

Symbolic: Top Trio

Michael Schlif with The Script Lab discusses the three key characters in a film. Schlif refers to them as the top trio: the shadow, the ghost, and the idol.

Read the full article here: Symbolic: Top Trio

Hollins Grads at Work: Jared M. Gordon

More Hollins Grads on the move!! Alum Jared Gordon recently released his project Multiple Choice. Here’s what Jared had to say about his the project:

“Multiple Choice is about Helen, an overachiever who, on the day of a final exam, must decide between receiving the test answers or discovering the identity of a secret admirer… There was a lot I wanted to say with this. It ultimately came down to the theme of living life being more important than grades. I wanted to show a compelling reversal from a character who was grade-obsessed to a one who demonstrated a willingness to take risks. I was lucky to work with very talented students and fellow faculty members, and I’m very pleased with how it came out.”

You can see the full film on Vimeo. Congratulations Jared! We are so proud of you!

Now on Vimeo: Multiple Choice by Hollins Grad Jared M. Gordon

The Power of Vulnerability

2017 Sundance Screenwriting Fellow Edson Oda discusses vulnerability and how it can empower you creatively as writer and filmmaker.


Lessons from Disney’s Zootopia

Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft breaks down the Disney film Zootopia to extract and discuss three big lessons for screenwriters to use in their stories.

Read full article here: Three Screenwriting Lessons that Disney’s “Zootopia” Can Teach Screenwriters