Ten Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Every story is different and there are different ways of telling a story. Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft discusses ten different story structures that writers can use to structure their screenplays. Yes, sometimes chronological order works best and makes the most sense. Other times, a different approach proves to be more effective or allows the storyteller to be more creative. All successful stories have a structure to them, but by utilizing different methods of structure, writers can create a more visually fascinating and engaging for the audience.

Read full article here: 10 Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Uncomplicating Complicated Plots

Creating complicated stories doesn’t need to be complicated. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft breaks down complicated story plots and offers advice on the best way writers can create the complicated stories. He uses films such as “Pulp Fiction”, “Memento”, and “The Sixth Sense” to illustrate the discussion.

Read full article here: 7 Simple Ways to Craft Complicated Plots in Screenplays

What is Stream of Consciousness Writing?

Sarah Cool shares Overall Adventures insights on a thing called stream of consciousness writing. What it is is simply sitting down with a journal or at a computer and literally writing everything that comes through your head as it comes to you. They explain the benefits of using this technique of writing and how it can help you create the world you want in your head and on paper, but can also help you solve problems in your real world.

Full article and video here: Stream Of Consciousness Writing

Symbolic: Top Trio

Michael Schlif with The Script Lab discusses the three key characters in a film. Schlif refers to them as the top trio: the shadow, the ghost, and the idol.

Read the full article here: Symbolic: Top Trio

The Power of Vulnerability

2017 Sundance Screenwriting Fellow Edson Oda discusses vulnerability and how it can empower you creatively as writer and filmmaker.


Lessons from Disney’s Zootopia

Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft breaks down the Disney film Zootopia to extract and discuss three big lessons for screenwriters to use in their stories.

Read full article here: Three Screenwriting Lessons that Disney’s “Zootopia” Can Teach Screenwriters

Writing the Buddy-Cop Movie

Shanee Edwards uses the film The Nice Guys to provide five helpful screenwriting insight for writing a buddy-cop movie.

Read full article here: The Nice Guys: 5 Tips for writing a buddy-cop movie

Reverse Engineering Your Screenplay

Indie Film Academy provides an interesting technique for getting your screenplay finished: reverse engineering. That’s a simple way of saying work backward. This may help you get over that seemingly impossible bump in the road or give you a new way to look at the writing process. Give a whirl and see how it works for you. Happy writing!

Read full article here: Reverse Engineering Your Screenplay

5 Ways You Can Determine If Your Script Is Done

One of the biggest mysteries for a creative person: is my work done? Well, Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft created a handy list to help you determine if and when your script is done, and what steps come next.

Read the full article here: 5 Ways You Can Determine If Your Script Is Done

Screenwriting 101: Ava DuVernay

Scott Myers shares some words of inspiration and encouragement from Ava DuVernay.

Read full article here: Screenwriting 101: Ava DuVernay