How to Trick Yourself Into Writing Your Screenplay

Naomi Beaty with ScreenCraft offers three tricks to help you get your screenplay done. Time and motivation are hard to come by sometimes, so you have to be creative about how you keep yourself from getting jaded.

Read the full article here: Trick Yourself Into Writing Your Screenplay

The MacGuffin

Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the MacGuffin, what it is, and how to properly use it to tell your story as effectively as possible. He uses films such as James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Citizen Kane to illustrate how the MacGuffin can be an effective storytelling tool and add conflict to the story.

Read the full article here: How Screenwriters Can Master the MacGuffin

Ten Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Every story is different and there are different ways of telling a story. Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft discusses ten different story structures that writers can use to structure their screenplays. Yes, sometimes chronological order works best and makes the most sense. Other times, a different approach proves to be more effective or allows the storyteller to be more creative. All successful stories have a structure to them, but by utilizing different methods of structure, writers can create a more visually fascinating and engaging for the audience.

Read full article here: 10 Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Story tricks from Spielberg’s BFG

Spielberg is an icon and a legend for good reason. Shanee Edwards with ScreenwritingU Magazine dissects the film to study seven story tricks screenwriters can use when creating children’s films.

Read the full article here: Spielberg gets all Spielbergian on The BFG: 7 great story tricks we learned from the cinematic giant

Symbolic: Top Trio

Michael Schlif with The Script Lab discusses the three key characters in a film. Schlif refers to them as the top trio: the shadow, the ghost, and the idol.

Read the full article here: Symbolic: Top Trio

A deep dive into character: Ken Biller and Noah Pink on Genius

Ken Biller and Noah Pink talk with Ramona Zacharias about writing the new biographical series on Albert Einstein and how they, with director Ron Howard, wanted to make this different from the standard biographical show. The new series on now airing on National Geographic.

Read full interview here: A deep dive into character: Ken Biller and Noah Pink on Genius

Being “open to receive luck”

The incredible Bryan Cranston opens up about ambition, his craft, and how everyone should be “open to receiving luck” when it comes their way.

“Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” – Seneca

Watch the full video here: Bryan Cranston on craft, ambition and being “open to receive luck”

STORY BROADS: 6 Top Tips for Dealing with Feedback

Vicky Hinault with Story Broads uses her delightful brand of humor and wit to deliver insight on how to deal with feedback. Every profession requires that you be receptive to feedback in some way, shape, or form; but it’s especially important in the creative world. Don’t worry, Quentin Tarantino still gets notes.

STORY BROADS: 6 Top Tips for Dealing with Feedback

Screenwriting Lessons: “The Social Network” — Part 2: Narrative Framework

Scott Meyers breaks down the Academy-award winning script of “The Social Network” to discuss the narrative framework and how that can propel your story in a strong direction.

Read the full article here: Screenwriting Lessons: “The Social Network” — Part 2: Narrative Framework

5 Storytelling Lessons from Bill Murray

John Bucher with LA Screenwriter extracts five storytelling lessons from the work of the legendary Bill Murray. He uses examples from films such as Ghostbusters, Lost in Translation, Groundhog Day, St. Vincent, and Rock the Kasbah to help illustrate each point. And seriously, who doesn’t love Bill Murray?

Read full article here: 5 Storytelling Lessons from Bill Murray