SCRIPT HACKS: 3 Kick-Ass Methods To Fix A Broken Screenplay Scene

Have you been staring at your computer screen at the blank page as the cursor taunts you with your inability to make it move? Caught yourself doodling on the blank notebook page because the words just. won’t. come. out. Is there a scene you’ve already written but, let’s face it, it’s pure fertilizer. If you have something on the page, you are halfway there. Give yourself a big high five. Don’t worry. Help is on the way! Alex Bloom with Script Magazine offers three “script hacks” on how to fix a broken scene so you can finish the story successfully and be on your way to winning your Oscar.

Read the full article here: SCRIPT HACKS: 3 Kick-Ass Methods To Fix A Broken Screenplay Scene

Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments: What’s the Difference?

Writing requires a tremendous amount of work and that work often happens in phases. If you were to look at the first drafts of Hamilton or Harry Potter, they would look undeniably different from their final products. First, you brainstorm. Then you create outlines about your story, the characters, the plot, and every other detail imaginable. Writers do this several times in several different ways. Then they write the first of many drafts. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the difference between outlines, treatments, and scriptments and how each of them is important to the story development process.

Read the full article here: Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments, Oh My!

The MacGuffin

Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the MacGuffin, what it is, and how to properly use it to tell your story as effectively as possible. He uses films such as James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Citizen Kane to illustrate how the MacGuffin can be an effective storytelling tool and add conflict to the story.

Read the full article here: How Screenwriters Can Master the MacGuffin

Watch: “The Godfather: Solozzo’s Death – Script to Screen Analysis”

Filmmaker Magazine provides and incredible script to screen analysis that uses commentary from an interview with Francis Ford Coppola. It is definitely worth watching.

Full video here: Watch: “The Godfather: Solozzo’s Death – Script to Screen Analysis”

Screenwriting Wisdom from the Screenwriter Behind “Fight Club”

Ken Miyamoto at ScreenCraft sat down with Jim Uhls to offer insight on writing, original work versus an adaptation, how to interview your characters, making both the analytical and intuitive sides of your brain to work together, tricks for pitch meetings, and how to handle that unavoidable demon known as writer’s block.

Read full article and watch full interview here: Screenwriting Wisdom from the Screenwriter Behind “Fight Club”

The ‘Jane Test’

Angela Watercutter at Wired magazine discusses the “Bechdel Test”, a simple three question test to gauge the level of gender bias (towards females in particular) that a film or story has. Watercutter goes a step farther and introduces what she calls the “Jane test”. The name is inspired by Natalie Portman’s character Jane Foster in the MCU’s Thor films. Following the lead of script reader and producer Ross Putnam, who began posting female character descriptions in scripts on Twitter, she adds three additional questions to consider. The point of the test is to evaluate how female characters are portrayed, not just onscreen, but on paper in the initial script so that female characters can be given the multi-dimensional qualities they deserve.

Read full article here: The “Jane” Test

Producers Share 5 Ways to Get Your Script Read

Hollywood producers sat down with the folks at ScreenCraft to give five secrets on how to get your scripts read and noticed by people in the business.

Click the link below to read and watch more.

Five Ways to Get Your Script Read