You’re a Great Screenwriter

But seriously, you are. It’s a hard thing to try to get better at something so subjective and difficult to measure, but I promise, you’re doing great! ScreenCraft agrees. They’ve put together this handy checklist to occasionally measure yourself up to. Even the best screenwriters deal with rejection and feelings of inadequacy because there’s not a simple way of knowing that you’re actually getting better. But if you’re looking for some positive validation that all of your hard work is paying off and making you a better screenwriter, here it is:

https://screencraft.org/2018/11/18/10-signs-youre-great-screenwriter/

Any tips on how you keep yourself in check and stay motivated to keep working? Please share them here. We could all use a little support.

How to Trick Yourself Into Writing Your Screenplay

Naomi Beaty with ScreenCraft offers three tricks to help you get your screenplay done. Time and motivation are hard to come by sometimes, so you have to be creative about how you keep yourself from getting jaded.

Read the full article here: Trick Yourself Into Writing Your Screenplay

Are Locations a Character?

The folks at ScreenCraft discuss the location of a screenplay and how it works as a character to a story. Films such as Fatal Attraction, The FugitiveIn the War of the Roses, and The Woodsman are used as examples to explain just how location plays a role in bringing your story to life and how it completes your story onscreen.

Read the full article here: Do Your Locations Have Character?

Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments: What’s the Difference?

Writing requires a tremendous amount of work and that work often happens in phases. If you were to look at the first drafts of Hamilton or Harry Potter, they would look undeniably different from their final products. First, you brainstorm. Then you create outlines about your story, the characters, the plot, and every other detail imaginable. Writers do this several times in several different ways. Then they write the first of many drafts. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the difference between outlines, treatments, and scriptments and how each of them is important to the story development process.

Read the full article here: Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments, Oh My!

The MacGuffin

Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the MacGuffin, what it is, and how to properly use it to tell your story as effectively as possible. He uses films such as James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Citizen Kane to illustrate how the MacGuffin can be an effective storytelling tool and add conflict to the story.

Read the full article here: How Screenwriters Can Master the MacGuffin

Common Misconceptions About Hollywood

Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft discusses common misconceptions about Hollywood, debunks the myths, and discusses the changes that the industry has experienced.

Read full article here: Top 5 Misconceptions Novice Screenwriters Have About Hollywood

Ten Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Every story is different and there are different ways of telling a story. Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft discusses ten different story structures that writers can use to structure their screenplays. Yes, sometimes chronological order works best and makes the most sense. Other times, a different approach proves to be more effective or allows the storyteller to be more creative. All successful stories have a structure to them, but by utilizing different methods of structure, writers can create a more visually fascinating and engaging for the audience.

Read full article here: 10 Screenplay Structures That Screenwriters Can Use

Uncomplicating Complicated Plots

Creating complicated stories doesn’t need to be complicated. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft breaks down complicated story plots and offers advice on the best way writers can create the complicated stories. He uses films such as “Pulp Fiction”, “Memento”, and “The Sixth Sense” to illustrate the discussion.

Read full article here: 7 Simple Ways to Craft Complicated Plots in Screenplays

*Music for Your Screenplays

Ken Miyamoto at ScreenCraft shares his thoughts on how to use music to enhance your screenplays and stories. He uses several films as examples to illustrate the power of music and how it can add that extra layer to the story for the audience.

Full article here: How to Use Music to Write Better Screenplays

 

*In other news, this is our 200th post!! Thanks for tagging along. Here’s to the next 200 🙂

Screenwriters Final Draft Checklist

Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft provides a checklist for screenwriters to use to perfect the final drafts of their screenplays. Consider these guidelines for a well-polished and ready script for readers.

Click here for full article: The Ultimate Final Draft Checklist for Screenwriters