Hollins University Web Series 2018: Failure to Adult

 

Failure to Adult-Cover Photo

This summer, the students in the Hollins University Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies video production class will release a seven-episode web series, called Failure to Adult, that was written, directed, and edited by Hollins University students. The writing took place during the spring semester prior and the filming of all seven episodes took place during the six-week summer session. It really is impressive what was accomplished in that time frame.

As a member of this class, I was incredibly excited to learn the filmmaking process from start to finish and script to screen as a new writer and filmmaker (I can say that now!). It was wonderful to learn each phase of the filmmaking process and how each phase brings its own set of challenges. We had six weeks to cast, shoot, edit, and premiere the web series. In order to do this successfully, we really had to work together and take on our own unique roles outside of rotating between the crew positions of Director, 1st Assistant Director (1st AD, the person who manages the set), Sound, Gaffer (the person in charge of the lights), props master/craft services (free food!), Director of Photography (DP), and Script Supervisor (scripty). While some of us hunted locations another corresponded with actors while somebody else organized all of our necessary information so we could all stay on the same page. It was a whirlwind of a process, but we are happy about the outcome. The coolest (and most terrifying) feeling was sitting in a room with peers and friends as we watched and laughed at the show we created. We got some strong feedback and are hopeful about how it will be received.

Feel free to check out the series and share it with people you know. It will officially launch in September on Vimeo and YouTube. Stay tuned!

Click here to see more details: Failure to Adult: Official Facebook Page

Press from NPR: Hollins Program Cranks Out Hopeful Filmmakers

Twitter: https://twitter.com/failtoadultHU

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/failuretoadulthu/ 

 

Do You Want to Light a Green Screen? Here’s how it’s done

The gentlemen at Aputure provide some tips and guidelines on how to use a green screen when shooting your films and when it’s the best time to use a blue screen instead.

Watch full video here: How Hollywood Lights Green Screens

Essential Lighting Tips

V Renee at No Film School shares advice on set lighting, how to get it, and where to put it.

Watch the video and read the article here: Essential Lighting Tips Every Filmmaker Should Know

Hook Your Audience with the First Shot

The opening shot of a film is such a key component in telling your story in your film. Logan Baker at The Premium Beat discusses the different techniques and aspects to consider when creating that first shot your audiences will see.

Full article here: How to Hook Your Audience

Every Filmmaking Form You’ll Ever Need

Paperwork! Every one loves paperwork (not). But it is a necessity in the developed world. This link will lead you to every piece of paperwork you will ever need to fill out in order to get your film made. Don’t thank me, thank your new guardian angel Adrijana Lazarevic at No Film School.

Forms du jour can be found here: Every Filmmaking Form You Will Ever Need in 99 Templates

Alumni Interviews with Dave Deborde

 davedeborde
 
HU: What brought you to screenwriting? How did your interest develop?  
 
DD: I grew up cracking jokes, telling stories, and acting out skits in the family kitchen. Whether you’re editing, acting, writing or directing, storytelling comes from the same core concepts and that was developed early on for me as well as a vivid imagination. 
 
HU: What were a few of the highlights of your experience at Hollins? 
 
DD: Playing in a band – The Rewrites! Geoff Geib introduced me to Ryan Adams (we played “New York New York”) and I’ve never been the same! Ilan on Keys, Matt on lead guitar, Joe on base, and Geoff on rhythm guitar. That was pretty sweet! 

Being able to just get away from the normal world for 6 weeks and focus (mostly) on the craft of screenwriting and the Hollins community. Tim’s guest speakers were amazing. Taking notes from them and networking was great! Hollywoods. Ping Pong!!! 
 
HU: Tell us a little about your professional life to this point – how did you land the jobs and were they positive experiences? 
 
DD: When people ask me what I do, I tell them, “I split my time between being a University Film professor and a filmmaker.”  
 
I am currently the Chair of Cinematic Arts at Lipscomb University, where I lead a grad program for Film MFA’s and an undergrad BFA in Film Production. Like all jobs in academia, there are good parts and bad parts. Since this is going online, I think I’ll shy away from listing the bad parts, but one of the amazing parts is – I take a group of my MFA’s to Cannes every year. That means, I get an all-expenses paid trip to the Cannes Film Festival every year! The food, the networking, the red carpets…the food! There are worse fates. 
 
I stay quite active in production.  
 
I am the showrunner for a reality TV show called, “Soccer Moms” and am in post-production on the season, running a team of about a half dozen editors.  
 
I’ve also been hired to write and produce a romantic comedy for a group out of London and Russia and this is a deal that sprouted out of meetings I had in Cannes over a year ago, which certainly speaks to the importance of being in the room with the right people. I’m planning on flying to Moscow and St. Petersburg within the month, to do location scouting, and yes, I’ve already started getting paid. 
 
HU: What was the experience like making Old Fashioned? How has it changed your professional life? 
 
DD: It took 12 years to put Old Fashioned out into theaters, which felt like it would NEVER happen! It was a total rollercoaster ride, which left some scars, and changed some relationships for both good and bad. This industry is tough, man!  
 
Being a producer on a theatrically released feature has certainly changed my trajectory and the scope of what I get considered for and paid to do. For instance, this British/Russian film that I’ve been hired to write and produce, the conversation started because they were speaking to a friend of mine at Cannes and mentioned they were looking for an American producer who had a theatrical release under his belt. BINGO! I was immediately allowed in the pool of candidates because of the OF producing credit.  
 
HU: Tell us about the next film you’re working on.  
 
DD: I’m in the middle of working on the Russian/British Rom-com. It’s currently an independent film, but folks at Lionsgate are interested in seeing how it develops with an eye toward getting involved. 
 
I am developing a feature with an exec at Lionsgate, which is a crossover Latino Rom-Com. Cool thing is, I developed this script while I was at Hollins. 
 
I am in development on a TV show to be shot in Australia and the main showrunner is from Battle Star Gallactica. Two other key players are a seasoned line producer and a former Paramount VP.  It’s really exciting to be a part of for a few reasons: it’s historical fiction, the overall size of the budget, subject matter and, of course, some free trips to Oz!!! Would it be gauche to ask for a bloomin’ onion upon arriving in Sydney? 
 
I’ve got some other things in the works as well that I might be able to talk about in a month or so, but I have to keep things quiet for the moment. 
 
 
HU: What is your life like now after graduation? 
 
DD: Super busy, but the level of my career both academically and production-wise, continue to rise. Also, I get to spend summers with my family now as opposed to being gone for 6 weeks for school!  
 
HU: Tell us about the Sunscreen Film Festival
 
I’m on the board of the Sunscreen Film Festival, which is a bi-coastal film fest and one of only 23 in the world with an Oscar sponsorship. We are known for our emphasis on Film education and were named one of the top 25 coolest film fests in the world by Moviemaker Magazine because of this emphasis. I am blessed to be the Education Director, so as a university Film prof, it’s a perfect fit for Sunscreen and me. 
 
We have a robust offering of panels and workshops, which have included major players in the industry (Mitch Bell, VP Marvel Studios, Victor Hsu, Producer of Transparent and Arrested Development, Ed Asner (UP), Patrick Warburton (Emperor’s New Groove), Ron Perlman (Hellboy), etc.). Coincidentally, last year, one of our screenwriting panels included Hollin’s profs: Goeff Geib, Kelly Fullerton and program director, Tim Albaugh. 
 
HU: Who was your favorite guest at Hollins? Or favorite screening. 
 
DD: Fave guest was Sean Sorenson, who works with Tim in production. Fave screening might have been Friends with Benefits – that was just a fun night and I think I won candy or something from the hat raffle thing. A Girl Walks Alone at Night, is up there as well.  
 
HU: Is there a class you wish you would have taken while you were at Hollins? 
 
DD: I would’ve liked to have taken a sitcom writing course. Also, writing for animation could’ve been cool. 
 
HU: Do you have any advice for the current Hollins students?
 
DD: If your plan is to teach and stay where you are, then do that. However, if your plan is to actually work in the industry as a professional screenwriter and/or filmmaker, then move to LA and start networking. You can begin by attending Sunscreen LA. I might know someone who can help with comp tickets… 

Bio:

Dave DeBorde is an award-winning filmmaker whose experience in the industry is long and varied. Dave has worked as a producer with legendary Hollywood producer William Gilmore (A Few Good Men), helped produce the award-winning short film The Least of These. In June of 2012, Dave directed the feature film romantic comedy Marriage Material. Dave was later hired the showrunner for the brand new reality TV show Soccer Moms, which is slated to broadcast regionally on network affiliates during primetime on Saturdays and is in negotiations for international distribution.
 
Alongside his various directing and producing credits, Dave is also heavily involved in performing arts education, creating the wildly successful educational tracks for the Sunscreen Film Festival, which was rated by MovieMaker magazine as one of the world’s Top 25 Most Attractive Film Festivals as a result of the educational tracks. Dave was likewise instrumental in bringing notable attendees and track participants, such as actors John Travolta (Pulp Fiction, Grease), Bill Cobb (Night at the Museum) and other contributors like screenwriter Tim Sexton (Children of Men), casting director John Jackson (Sideways, About Schmidt, The Descendants), producers Sean Covel (Napoleon Dynamite), Ralph Winter (Wolverine), and Dean Batali (That 70’s Show). Dave is also the department chair of the Cinematic Arts at Lipscomb University and recently worked as producer of the successful independent romantic comedy Old Fashioned. Dave serves as the President of Soverignty Pictures and is the chief creative conduit responsible for the artistic direction of the company.

How to Build a Movie Set in Your Garage

For those who feel brave enough to DIY your own movie set, Zach Daulton at No Film School gives some pointers on how to build your own film set.

How to Build a Movie Set in Your Garage

And…Action!

Here is a list of the state film office and commission websites. You can find information about how to get involved with local film events, jobs, and internships. There are tons of job search sites, but these are the direct websites for the film offices that can help you find jobs and resources.

Have fun 🙂

State Film Office Websites:

Alabama Film Office

Alaska Film Group

Arizona Production Association

Arizona Film and Media Coalition

Arkansas Production Alliance

California Film Commission

Colorado Office of Film, Television and Media

Connecticut: Office of Film, Television and Digital Media

Delaware Film Office

The Florida Office of Film and Entertainment

Georgia Film, Music and Digital Entertainment Office

Hawaii Film Office

Idaho Media Professionals/Idaho Film Office

Illinois Production Alliance

Film Indiana

Iowa Motion Picture Association

Kansas Department of Commerce Film Commission

Kentucky Film Office

Louisiana Entertainment

Maine Film Office

Maryland Film Office

Massachusetts Production Coalition

Michigan Film Production

Minnesota Film and TV

Mississippi Film Office

Missouri Film Office

Montana Film Office

Nebraska Film Office

Nevada Film Office

New Hampshire Film and Television Office

New Jersey Motion Picture and Television Commission

New Mexico Film Office

Made in New York: Office of Film, Theatre and Broadcast

North Carolina Film Office

North Dakota Film Production

Ohio Film Office

Oklahoma Film and Music Office

Oregon Governor’s Office of Film and Television

Pennsylvania Film Office

Rhode Island Film and TV Office

South Carolina Film Commission

South Dakota Film Office

Texas Film Commission

Utah Film Commission

Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development, Film and New Media

Virginia Film Office

Virginia Production Alliance

Washington Filmworks

Washington DC Motion Picture and Television Development

West Virginia Film Office

Film Wisconsin

Film Wyoming

Extras:

WIFV: Women in Film – Washington DC

List of State Film Commission Offices

National Film Board of Canada

Film in Puerto Rico