Who’s Who at Hollins U?

Hollins University is a little, hidden gem. The gorgeous campus is nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia where cicadas buzz about while you sit in a rocking chair on the front porch. It’s mostly known as a women’s college and has some famous alumnae, such as children’s author Margaret Wise Brown. But the university also has fantastic, low-residency, co-ed, graduate programs. Among them is the summer graduate screenwriting and film studies program. Since this unique program runs for only six weeks during the summers, students here have had the opportunity to learn from numerous industry professionals, whether they serve as professors or guest speakers. The specialties of our visiting faculty include horror, children’s television, comedy, drama, minorities in film, and production. While we have many professors who join us summer after summer, no two summers have the same line up of professors, so there are plenty of opportunities to learn from as many industry experts and make as many professional connections as possible from other universities such as UCLA and NYU. Included is the list of professors who have graced Hollins University in past summers and who will be joining us this summer. See any familiar names? Great! Come learn from them here at Hollins.

See the full list of visiting faculty here: Hollins University Summer Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies Visiting Faculty

See the full list of Program Faculty here: Program Faculty at Hollins Summer Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies

Introducing Summer 2017 Faculty: Linda Voorhees

Hollins University Summer Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies would like to extend a warm welcome to Linda Voorhees! Linda is joining us for the first time this summer from UCLA. Read more about Linda and her career in her biography below. 

Welcome to the Hollins family, Linda! 

PROFESSIONAL STATUS:

WGA  Member in good standing

EDUCATION:

Received Master of Fine Arts Degree from UCLA / TFT 1991

TEACHING & PROFESSIONAL LECTURES:

1992 to Present  UCLA
Graduate Advanced Screenwriting Workshop 434
Undergraduate Advanced Screenwriting Workshop
Graduate Screenwriting for Non-majors
Large Lecture Undergraduate Screenwriting Fundamentals
Undergraduate Screenwriting Workshop
Graduate Screenwriting for Directors

1992
Women in Film — Lecture Series
Screenwriting Basics
Female Characters
Heroine

1995
Chapman University
Graduate Advanced Screenwriting Feature Film
Graduate Screenwriting Short Film

1995
WGA Lecture Series
Women in Writing
Female Characters
Development Process

1996 to Present
UCLA Professional Program Screenwriting
Screenwriting Workshop — On campus
Screenwriting Workshop — On line
Advanced Screenwriting Workshop
Screenplay development and critique
Skills Lecturer

1996
WGA Committee Presentation
Women in independent film
Writing the Indy Film

1998
WGA Panel Independent Film Writing

2001 to Present
Pixar Animation Studio — Pixar University
Short Film Writing
Web Series Writing
Feature Film Writing
Rewriting
Lecture Series

2007
Victoria University, Wellington New Zealand
Graduate Advanced Screenwriting Workshop
Graduate Lecture Series
Graduate Overview of Development Process

2007
Aukland New Zealand Writers Guild — Lecture Series
Structure
Character
Rewriting

2007
Wellington New Zealand Film Commission
Presentation of Women’s Place in Film
Development Process
Rewriting

2013
UCLA International Filmmakers — Iran and Italy
Screenwriting Basics
Structure

2014
UCLA Performing Arts Camp — High School
TV Writing
Playwriting
Screenwriting
Short Film writing

2015
UCLA Filmmaking by Design — Lecture
International Participants — Australia and Nigeria
Pitching
Development

PROFESSIONAL WORK:

Received the IMAGEN award for my produced script, “Crazy from the Heart.”  The story centered around issues of racism in a Texas border town.

Recognized by GLAAD for my produced script, “Two Mothers for Zachary.”  A story that illuminated the struggle of lesbian partners who fought the legal system to maintain custody of their child.

Received the Jack Nicholson Award for Screenwriting for portraying a positive image of feminism and women in leadership roles in my script, “Mother Earth!”

Over the course of my professional writing career, I’ve worked as a screenwriter or a script consultant for the following organizations:

ABC Network
CBS Network
Columbia Sony
Disney Animation Studio
Disney Touchstone Studio
HBO Cable
Lifetime Cable
NBC Network
MGM
Paramount Pictures
Pixar Animation Studio
Showtime Cable
TNT / SPIKE Cable
USA Cable

Episode Four of Page Ten Podcast

podcastphoto1

Episode four of Page Ten, the Hollins University Screenwriting Podcast, is up and running, just click on the link below, or if you’d rather, it’s also available to download on iTunes. Head over and take a listen to the interview with guest Lawrence Ross, and if you like what you hear, be sure to subscribe and catch future episodes.

Episode Three of Page Ten Podcast

podcastphoto1
Episode three of Page Ten is up and running, just click on the link below, or if you’d rather, it’s also available to download on iTunes. Head over and take a listen to the interview with guest Barbara Curry, and if you like what you hear, be sure to subscribe and catch future episodes.

Alumni Interviews with Dave Deborde

 davedeborde
 
HU: What brought you to screenwriting? How did your interest develop?  
 
DD: I grew up cracking jokes, telling stories, and acting out skits in the family kitchen. Whether you’re editing, acting, writing or directing, storytelling comes from the same core concepts and that was developed early on for me as well as a vivid imagination. 
 
HU: What were a few of the highlights of your experience at Hollins? 
 
DD: Playing in a band – The Rewrites! Geoff Geib introduced me to Ryan Adams (we played “New York New York”) and I’ve never been the same! Ilan on Keys, Matt on lead guitar, Joe on base, and Geoff on rhythm guitar. That was pretty sweet! 

Being able to just get away from the normal world for 6 weeks and focus (mostly) on the craft of screenwriting and the Hollins community. Tim’s guest speakers were amazing. Taking notes from them and networking was great! Hollywoods. Ping Pong!!! 
 
HU: Tell us a little about your professional life to this point – how did you land the jobs and were they positive experiences? 
 
DD: When people ask me what I do, I tell them, “I split my time between being a University Film professor and a filmmaker.”  
 
I am currently the Chair of Cinematic Arts at Lipscomb University, where I lead a grad program for Film MFA’s and an undergrad BFA in Film Production. Like all jobs in academia, there are good parts and bad parts. Since this is going online, I think I’ll shy away from listing the bad parts, but one of the amazing parts is – I take a group of my MFA’s to Cannes every year. That means, I get an all-expenses paid trip to the Cannes Film Festival every year! The food, the networking, the red carpets…the food! There are worse fates. 
 
I stay quite active in production.  
 
I am the showrunner for a reality TV show called, “Soccer Moms” and am in post-production on the season, running a team of about a half dozen editors.  
 
I’ve also been hired to write and produce a romantic comedy for a group out of London and Russia and this is a deal that sprouted out of meetings I had in Cannes over a year ago, which certainly speaks to the importance of being in the room with the right people. I’m planning on flying to Moscow and St. Petersburg within the month, to do location scouting, and yes, I’ve already started getting paid. 
 
HU: What was the experience like making Old Fashioned? How has it changed your professional life? 
 
DD: It took 12 years to put Old Fashioned out into theaters, which felt like it would NEVER happen! It was a total rollercoaster ride, which left some scars, and changed some relationships for both good and bad. This industry is tough, man!  
 
Being a producer on a theatrically released feature has certainly changed my trajectory and the scope of what I get considered for and paid to do. For instance, this British/Russian film that I’ve been hired to write and produce, the conversation started because they were speaking to a friend of mine at Cannes and mentioned they were looking for an American producer who had a theatrical release under his belt. BINGO! I was immediately allowed in the pool of candidates because of the OF producing credit.  
 
HU: Tell us about the next film you’re working on.  
 
DD: I’m in the middle of working on the Russian/British Rom-com. It’s currently an independent film, but folks at Lionsgate are interested in seeing how it develops with an eye toward getting involved. 
 
I am developing a feature with an exec at Lionsgate, which is a crossover Latino Rom-Com. Cool thing is, I developed this script while I was at Hollins. 
 
I am in development on a TV show to be shot in Australia and the main showrunner is from Battle Star Gallactica. Two other key players are a seasoned line producer and a former Paramount VP.  It’s really exciting to be a part of for a few reasons: it’s historical fiction, the overall size of the budget, subject matter and, of course, some free trips to Oz!!! Would it be gauche to ask for a bloomin’ onion upon arriving in Sydney? 
 
I’ve got some other things in the works as well that I might be able to talk about in a month or so, but I have to keep things quiet for the moment. 
 
 
HU: What is your life like now after graduation? 
 
DD: Super busy, but the level of my career both academically and production-wise, continue to rise. Also, I get to spend summers with my family now as opposed to being gone for 6 weeks for school!  
 
HU: Tell us about the Sunscreen Film Festival
 
I’m on the board of the Sunscreen Film Festival, which is a bi-coastal film fest and one of only 23 in the world with an Oscar sponsorship. We are known for our emphasis on Film education and were named one of the top 25 coolest film fests in the world by Moviemaker Magazine because of this emphasis. I am blessed to be the Education Director, so as a university Film prof, it’s a perfect fit for Sunscreen and me. 
 
We have a robust offering of panels and workshops, which have included major players in the industry (Mitch Bell, VP Marvel Studios, Victor Hsu, Producer of Transparent and Arrested Development, Ed Asner (UP), Patrick Warburton (Emperor’s New Groove), Ron Perlman (Hellboy), etc.). Coincidentally, last year, one of our screenwriting panels included Hollin’s profs: Goeff Geib, Kelly Fullerton and program director, Tim Albaugh. 
 
HU: Who was your favorite guest at Hollins? Or favorite screening. 
 
DD: Fave guest was Sean Sorenson, who works with Tim in production. Fave screening might have been Friends with Benefits – that was just a fun night and I think I won candy or something from the hat raffle thing. A Girl Walks Alone at Night, is up there as well.  
 
HU: Is there a class you wish you would have taken while you were at Hollins? 
 
DD: I would’ve liked to have taken a sitcom writing course. Also, writing for animation could’ve been cool. 
 
HU: Do you have any advice for the current Hollins students?
 
DD: If your plan is to teach and stay where you are, then do that. However, if your plan is to actually work in the industry as a professional screenwriter and/or filmmaker, then move to LA and start networking. You can begin by attending Sunscreen LA. I might know someone who can help with comp tickets… 

Bio:

Dave DeBorde is an award-winning filmmaker whose experience in the industry is long and varied. Dave has worked as a producer with legendary Hollywood producer William Gilmore (A Few Good Men), helped produce the award-winning short film The Least of These. In June of 2012, Dave directed the feature film romantic comedy Marriage Material. Dave was later hired the showrunner for the brand new reality TV show Soccer Moms, which is slated to broadcast regionally on network affiliates during primetime on Saturdays and is in negotiations for international distribution.
 
Alongside his various directing and producing credits, Dave is also heavily involved in performing arts education, creating the wildly successful educational tracks for the Sunscreen Film Festival, which was rated by MovieMaker magazine as one of the world’s Top 25 Most Attractive Film Festivals as a result of the educational tracks. Dave was likewise instrumental in bringing notable attendees and track participants, such as actors John Travolta (Pulp Fiction, Grease), Bill Cobb (Night at the Museum) and other contributors like screenwriter Tim Sexton (Children of Men), casting director John Jackson (Sideways, About Schmidt, The Descendants), producers Sean Covel (Napoleon Dynamite), Ralph Winter (Wolverine), and Dean Batali (That 70’s Show). Dave is also the department chair of the Cinematic Arts at Lipscomb University and recently worked as producer of the successful independent romantic comedy Old Fashioned. Dave serves as the President of Soverignty Pictures and is the chief creative conduit responsible for the artistic direction of the company.

Episode Two of Page Ten Podcast

podcastphoto1
Episode two of Page Ten is up and running, just click on the link below, or if you’d rather, it’s also available to download on iTunes. Head over and take a listen to the second half of the interview with guest Kelly Fullerton, and if you like what you hear, be sure to subscribe and catch future episodes.

Page Ten Podcast on iTunes

Page Ten Podcast on iTunes

Episode One of Page Ten Podcast

podcastphoto1

Geoff Geib talks shop with fellow screenwriters from around Los Angeles.

Page Ten is sponsored by the Hollins University Screenwriting MFA Program. Produced and edited by Bobbo Byrnes and recorded at Wandering Star Studios.

EPISODE 1 – Kelly Fullerton

Interview with Alumnus & Professor Matt Marshall

Profile Pic

HU: What brought you to screenwriting?

MM: To be honest it was the only thing left in the arts I hadn’t tried yet. I have a background in Art History, Music Composition, and Theatre. I love film and had taught and studied every aspect of it except STORY. It felt like the right way to close my educational loop.

HU: What was your first script about?

MM: It was about a painter who wonders what would happen if two people imagine each other at the same moment. Would they be able to meet for real? The painter imagines a writer is writing a story about her. As the writer sits in the coffee shop he begins to write a story about this painter. Suddenly she appears out the window. He can’t believe she has materialized. He must meet her. What will happen when they see each other? Probably would have made a decent Twilight Zone episode back in the day.

HU: What were the highlights of your experiences at HU both as a student and as a professor?

MM: As a student, making my first film in Amy Gerber-Stroh’s video class. It was a life changing experience looking through the lens and breaking the world up into little rectangles. As a professor, every conversation I had with a student as they were getting excited about a new story or paper idea. When ideas start taking hold, it is such a beautiful experience to be in the presence of people who are riding or creating this wave.

HU: Is there a class you wish you had here as a student? What would it be?

MM: Screenwriting for Playwrights/Playwriting for Screenwriters. Some sort of class that addresses both forms where screenwriters can get a good dialogue polish from playwrights and playwrights can learn how they can be more VISUAL on stage. It would be cross listed so students in the Playwriting and Screenwriting programs would both get credit. We can learn a lot from each other.

HU: What were the best/worst movies you’ve seen this year? Why?
MM: The Revenant and Mad Max because they were the MOST cinematic. They were relentless and unapologetic. They don’t exist on the page. They exist on the screen.  Yes, a bit on the macho side, and perhaps they appeal to my inner Rambo, but they were extraordinary experiences in the theater. Ex Machina was the most satisfying intellectual experience last year. The worst film last year was Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens. It was a total cop-out, vote-of-no-confidence in the new material film. It completely pandered to nostalgia and was nothing less than plagiarism of a New Hope. (Sorry. I know I’m in the minority on this one.)


HU: Who’s your favorite screenwriter?

MM: For dialogue, I love Ingmar Bergman and Tarantino. David Lynch is my favorite Art Film writer. He creates amazing nightmare movies. Wes Anderson overall. I love his foregrounding of awkward pauses and quirky behavior. The Anderson formula is children behaving like adults and adults behaving like children. You can’t go wrong with that sort of contrast. 

HU: Do you have any advice for current students?

MM: The most important thing you can do to become a successful screenwriter is to cultivate an insatiable curiosity for life. Become a student of humanity. Read philosophy. Go as deep as you can. Experience everything you can. Always observe for meaning, even when you are in line at the grocery store. Your knowledge of story structure will not create a compelling story. Your point of view and experience will. The structure is just there to help you give this experience some shape. 

HU: What was your favorite class as a student? Why?

MM: Well, it is important to understand that I was a student pre-Tim Albaugh, so I never benefited from the programs he has brought since, particularly the writing for television courses, which I wish I had taken. It was actually a Playwriting class I took as an elective that really stimulated my creative writing energies. We were given writing prompts. Certain props had to be in our play. Certain phrases had to be said. Certain themes had to be present. Because we had these guidelines, we ended up writing things we wouldn’t possibly have come up with on our own. We learned how to problem solve, how to fit certain story elements together. I found this to be incredibly useful in terms of long-term creativity. When you have prompts, you flex certain muscles that you don’t when the story is left completely up to you. 

HU: Tell us about your professional life to this point. What was the transition like from student to a professor?

MM: I will openly admit I have found it very difficult to teach and make time for professional writing. I’ve loved teaching and the interaction with students and the wonderful ideas and observations the classroom environment facilitates, but I am looking forward to transitioning to full-time writing in the next two months. Some can balance both well but I cannot.  I have a television series in development dealing with the Edgar Allan Poe character Roderick Usher (from Fall of the House of Usher). It is a sort of Penny Dreadful of the Edgar Allan Poe world and actress Adrienne King, the heroine from the original Friday the 13th (1980) has been kind enough to try to get it off the ground. She is a fellow Long Islander. I have another television series that deals with Scrooge and Marley, the early years when they were in business together before Christmas Carol picks up, and I’m still working with NY Times Best selling fantasy author Katherine Kurtz, adapting her novel, St. Patrick’s Gargoyle, which hopefully will go into production in the next year or two in Dublin. It is always good to have a few pots on the stove. Something will eventually boil over.   

HU: I know you and I share a deep love and appreciation for music, and for you that was part of what inspired your passion for films. What is your favorite movie score/soundtrack? Who is your favorite movie score composer? Why?

MM: I wish I had a more specialized niche answer but Bernard Herrmann by far. His score for Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo is extraordinary. I actually consider Vertigo a Music Drama, a spoken word opera. The music gives you more insight into what the characters are thinking, feeling, remembering, regretting, wishing, than any of the dialogue. You can listen to the score and follow the story. I also love Peter Gabriel’s score for the Last Temptation of Christ.

Nice Shirt, Sarah!

Hollins people do some pretty awesome stuff. Way to go Sarah!
P.S. Nice shirt
Nice Shirt Sarah
Snagged Facebook post featuring Hollins student Sarah Vesely:
“Last evening, the GVSU Film/Video Alumni‘s Executive board met to prepare for 2016-2017. We have so many great things planned and we’ll be informing you of events soon!

This was the first meeting with our new president, Sarah Vesely. Sarah is a screenwriter and videographer. She is a 2014 grad of the GVSU Film & Video program, earning a B.A. in Film & Video Production. She is currently working on her M.F.A. in Screenwriting through Hollins University. Sarah works at the Grand Rapids Community Media Center, overseeing the GRTV help desk and local film education club, Cinema Lab. She is also a creator and organizer of the Grand Rapids Feminist Film Festival, entering its third year. Sarah currently resides in Grand Rapids, Michigan, with her partner Nick and their dog, Special Agent Dale Cooper.

We’d like to extend a thank you to our former president, DeLain Bomer III. DeLain took a job on the other side of the state recently. Congrats on your new job, DeLain, and thank you for your service!

— at Biggby Coffee Plainfield.”