Ready to Make a Film Soundtrack?

Music plays such a vital role in the film and storytelling process. Alfred Hitchcock considered this role to be so important, he often listed his music directors directly after his name in the opening credits of his films. The folks at Film Courage sat down with music producer Harvey Mason, Jr to discuss everything from how to create a film soundtrack, what a music producer actually does to moving to Los Angeles to what happens after saying “YES” to a project.

Harvey Mason’s work includes SING, DreamGirls, Pitch Perfect, Sparkle, and The Wiz Live!

See the full video, article, and Harvey’s bio here: First Steps In Making A Movie Soundtrack by Harvey Mason, Jr.

How to Trick Yourself Into Writing Your Screenplay

Naomi Beaty with ScreenCraft offers three tricks to help you get your screenplay done. Time and motivation are hard to come by sometimes, so you have to be creative about how you keep yourself from getting jaded.

Read the full article here: Trick Yourself Into Writing Your Screenplay

Getting Started as an Actor

Casting Associate Michael Duni sits down with acting coach Richard Warner to discuss how to get started as an actor, whether it’s early or later in life.

See the full video here: arvold. CONVERSATION: Getting Started in Acting

6 Filmmaking Tips from Ben Wheatley

Christopher Campbell from Film School Rejects gathers and shares six pieces of filmmaking advice from British filmmaker Ben Wheatley. As creatives, we find inspiration from many people, places, events, and things. Here’s more insight into how one successful filmmaker gets work done. Use your inspiration wisely ūüôā

Read the full article here: 6 Filmmaking Tips from Ben Wheatley

Are Locations a Character?

The folks at ScreenCraft discuss the location of a screenplay and how it works as a character to a story. Films such as Fatal Attraction, The Fugitive, In the War of the Roses, and The Woodsman are used as examples to explain just how location plays a role in bringing your story to life and how it completes your story onscreen.

Read the full article here: Do Your Locations Have Character?

Happy Birthday, Tim!

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On behalf of everyone at Hollins University, I’d like to wish a very happy birthday to Tim Albaugh*, the director of the Hollins University Summer Graduate Screenwriting and Film Studies program.

For over a decade, Tim has worked tirelessly as a champion for not only the program but for every single student who joins the Hollins University family. Running a graduate program based in Virginia from the opposite end of the country in California is no easy task, and Tim does so willingly with enthusiasm, diligence, good humor, and love. Whether students are gathered in Texas, California, or Virginia, Tim has made genuine efforts to build a strong community of creatives, artists, and storytellers.

Thank you for all your hard work, encouragement, and support. Here’s to your next lap around the sun. May there be many more.

 

*Link to biography

 

Who’s Who at Hollins U?

Hollins University is a little, hidden gem. The gorgeous campus is nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia where cicadas buzz about while you sit in a rocking chair on the front porch. It’s mostly known as a women’s college and has some famous alumnae, such as children’s author Margaret Wise Brown. But the university also has fantastic, low-residency, co-ed, graduate programs. Among them is the summer graduate screenwriting and film studies program. Since this unique program runs for only six weeks during the summers, students here have had the opportunity to learn from numerous industry professionals, whether they serve as professors or guest speakers. The specialties of¬†our visiting faculty include horror, children’s television, comedy, drama, minorities in film, and production. While we have many professors who join us summer after summer, no two summers have the same line up¬†of professors, so there are plenty of opportunities¬†to learn from as many industry¬†experts and make as many professional connections as possible from other universities such as UCLA and NYU. Included is the list of professors who have graced Hollins University in past summers and who will be joining us this summer. See any familiar names? Great! Come learn from them here at Hollins.

See the full list of visiting faculty here: Hollins University Summer Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies Visiting Faculty

See the full list of Program Faculty here: Program Faculty at Hollins Summer Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies

How to Become a Film Director

Stephanie Forshee with Backstage provides some insight and guidance to budding and aspiring film directors. She answers every question such as what does a film director really do, how to get started, and how to find your artistic style as a director. She discusses several examples of how some of the most famous directors got their start. She reminds readers of one truth of the business: everyone’s path is different

Read the Full Article Here: How to Become a Film Director

How to Handle Yourself Like a Professional as You Navigate the Acting Business

Okay, so you’ve gone to twenty gazillion auditions, it feels like, and you’ve heard nothing yet. But you HAVE to know the results of your auditions. You’re desperate to book work. So what do you do? When should you hear something? Do you follow up? How often should you follow up? To quote Tom Petty, the waiting is the hardest part. So, what should you do while you’re waiting for a “yes”? Rachel with Cast It Talent offers insight for actors on how to stay on their radar in a professional manner as you work your way into the acting business.

Read the full article here: How to Stay on a CD’s Radar (Without Annoying Them to Death

SCRIPT HACKS: 3 Kick-Ass Methods To Fix A Broken Screenplay Scene

Have you been staring at your computer screen at the blank page as the cursor taunts you with your inability to make it move? Caught yourself doodling on the blank notebook page because the words just. won’t. come. out. Is there a scene you’ve already written but, let’s face it, it’s pure fertilizer. If you have something on the page, you are halfway there. Give yourself a big high five. Don’t worry. Help is on the way! Alex Bloom with Script¬†Magazine offers three “script hacks” on how to fix a broken scene so you can finish the story successfully and be on your way to winning your Oscar.

Read the full article here: SCRIPT HACKS: 3 Kick-Ass Methods To Fix A Broken Screenplay Scene