Write Club: 5 Choices You Must Make Before You Start Writing

Welcome to Write Club. The first rule of write club is… just kidding. (Sorry, I had to.) We’re writers not fighters, so talk about write club all you want. The folks at ScreenCraft discuss five choices a writer must make before they begin writing their story. These five questions will help guide the writer through the development of their story as well as help the writer figure out how their story will influence the genre.

Read the full article here: Write Club: 5 Choices You Must Make Before You Start Writing

The Q&A with 9 Oscar-Nominated Screenwriters

Jeff Goldsmith with ScreenCraft sat down with nine of the 2016 Oscar nominees in the Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay categories to talk about everything from the best writing advice to favorite procrastinating methods – yes, you read the correctly, as well as battling the obstacles and demons. Enjoy.

 

Full article and podcast here: The Q&A with 9 Oscar-Nominated Screenwriters

The ‘Jane Test’

Angela Watercutter at Wired magazine discusses the “Bechdel Test”, a simple three question test to gauge the level of gender bias (towards females in particular) that a film or story has. Watercutter goes a step farther and introduces what she calls the “Jane test”. The name is inspired by Natalie Portman’s character Jane Foster in the MCU’s Thor films. Following the lead of script reader and producer Ross Putnam, who began posting female character descriptions in scripts on Twitter, she adds three additional questions to consider. The point of the test is to evaluate how female characters are portrayed, not just onscreen, but on paper in the initial script so that female characters can be given the multi-dimensional qualities they deserve.

Read full article here: The “Jane” Test

STORY BROADS: 5 Tips to Get Your Story on the Page

Co-founder of Story Broads Despina Karintis, with her engaging brand of humor, provides five steps to help writers get the story OUT of their head and ON to the page.

STORY BROADS: 5 Tips to Get Your Story on the Page

Why You Shouldn’t “Write What Sells”

Shawn from Microbudget Film Lab discusses why “write what sells” is a terrible piece of advice, especially if you’re an independent/microbudget filmmaker.

Main take away: “write what you’re passionate about” and “write about what really moves you”.

Civil discussion is always welcome.

Watch full video here: Why You Shouldn’t “Write What Sells”

Notes from Aaron Sorkin’s Screenwriting MasterClass

MASTERCLASS has been providing incredible opportunities for newcomers to creative industries to learn from the masters. You can learn cooking from Gordon Ramsay to acting from Kevin Spacey to tennis with Serena Williams. One Reddit user chronicled his experience with Aaron Sorkin’s MasterClass on Screenwriting.

Read the full article here: Notes from Aaron Sorkin’s Screenwriting Masterclass

Eleven Stages of a Master Screenplay

Robert Misovic at Pensare Films provided a different take on and breakdown of a screenplay. Misovic breaks a screenplay down into eleven steps, as opposed to the nine provided by the standard plot points. He uses films such as Rocky, The Godfather, Gone Girl, Titanic, Jaws, and Jurassic Park to illustrate each step.

11 Stages of a Master Screenplay

Creating the Ultimate Antagonist

This video explains how to create the ultimate antagonist. Using The Dark Knight and Heath Ledger’s character of the Joker as an example, they breakdown precisely the goals of an effective antagonist.

Watch here: Lessons from the Screenplay: The Dark Knight – Creating the Ulitmate Antagonist

60 Things for Your Characters to DO While They Talk or Think

Creating and developing every little thing characters do in your stories is, although rewarding, very exhausting. As screenwriters, we have to take this task one step further and write the characters’ actions in such a way that they can be understood so they can be converted to images and actions performed. Long story short, show don’t tell. The author, Amanda Patterson, also provides within the article a “cheat sheet for writing body language” and “five simple ways to describe characters”.

Check out the full article: 60 Things for Your Characters to do When They Talk or Think