A deep dive into character: Ken Biller and Noah Pink on Genius

Ken Biller and Noah Pink talk with Ramona Zacharias about writing the new biographical series on Albert Einstein and how they, with director Ron Howard, wanted to make this different from the standard biographical show. The new series on now airing on National Geographic.

Read full interview here: A deep dive into character: Ken Biller and Noah Pink on Genius

The Engine of Empathy

Caitlin Durante provides three key rules to effectively convey characters’ emotions in your stories and screenplays. She pulls examples from The Godfather, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Edward Scissorhands to help illustrate the points.

Read full article here: The Engine of Empathy: Three Ways To Convey Characters’ Emotions

5 Ways to Get Into Character

Ken Lazer with Backstage provides five tricks to help actors get into character as you prepare to meet with a casting director or getting ready to go on stage.

Read full article here: 5 Ways to Get Into Character

STORY DEVELOPMENT: How Plot Can Kill Your Character

Tim Long at SCRIPT discusses three ways plot can kill your story’s character development. He discusses that a writer’s first focus should be on developing the character and making them compelling and engaging to the audience. Once that is done, the plot will be better to work with and easier to direct.

Full article here: STORY DEVELOPMENT: How Plot Can Kill Your Character

Learn Character Development from the Film that Does it Best: The Graduate

More good stuff from the folks at No Film School. Max Winter uses the film The Graduate to provide insight on developing your story characters.

Blogger’s Note: If you’ve never seen The Graduate, watch it. It’s an incredible film with wonderful actors (Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft) and a fantastic soundtrack from the legendary Simon & Garfunkel.

Watch and read here: Learn Character Development from “The Graduate”

Revealing a Character’s Backstory

Martha Alderson at Script Magazine shares some secrets on how to reveal your character’s backstory wound, which plays just as vital a role as the current story being told. The backstory is what helps explain to the audience the hows, whats, and whys of the character when the audience meets them and why this journey that character is on is so crucial.

Check out the full article here: How to Reveal Your Character’s Backstory Wound

60 Things for Your Characters to DO While They Talk or Think

Creating and developing every little thing characters do in your stories is, although rewarding, very exhausting. As screenwriters, we have to take this task one step further and write the characters’ actions in such a way that they can be understood so they can be converted to images and actions performed. Long story short, show don’t tell. The author, Amanda Patterson, also provides within the article a “cheat sheet for writing body language” and “five simple ways to describe characters”.

Check out the full article: 60 Things for Your Characters to do When They Talk or Think

Choosing Your Character’s Appearance

A multitude of factors go into developing characters: their personality, their problems that they have to overcome, their quirks, their backstory, and their appearance. Blogger Hannah Heath provides some helpful tips and insight on how to decide on your character’s appearance and how the exterior appearance of the character is just as important as the interior (e.g. behaviors, emotions, personality) of the character and how one aspect influences the other.

You can read the full article here: 7 Tips for Choosing Your Character’s Appearance