The Power of Rejection

As screenwriters, we get rejected a lot. If you haven’t, you’re either very lucky, or very new at this. Submitting your work and having it ignored (if you’re lucky) or ripped apart (if you’re not), doesn’t have to be the end of the world. Learning from rejection is a time-honored rite of passage for all aspiring creators. Harry Potter was rejected by publishers a solid twelve times, sometimes with harsh words, before our favorite boy wizard inspired seven books, eight films, and three theme parks.

If your pitch, story, or screenplay is turned down, congratulations! You thought of something, made it, and showed it to someone else. That is something to be commended and celebrated. Use this time to pat yourself on the back for being brave, but also use it as a time to see where you went wrong. Improve your structure, take another look at the dialogue, tweak and tighten, so that when you submit it again (which you definitely will), it’ll be that much harder to turn down.

And while you may be discouraged, take heart in the fact that some of our favorite movies of all time were passed over before finding their way to the big screen. See some shocking examples here, watch Brian Grazer’s words of encouragement here, and share in the comments something you’ve learned from rejection.

Resume Advice for Screenwriters

Jacob N. Stuart, the Founder of Screenwriting Staffing, provides advice and guidance on how to create a screenwriter’s resume. He provides “12 Overview Points” about the who, what, when, why, and how about the information your writer’s resume needs to become gainfully employed as a writer in the business.

Read the full article here: A “HOW TO” GUIDE FOR WRITING THE “SCREENWRITER’S RESUME”

Ready to Make a Film Soundtrack?

Music plays such a vital role in the film and storytelling process. Alfred Hitchcock considered this role to be so important, he often listed his music directors directly after his name in the opening credits of his films. The folks at Film Courage sat down with music producer Harvey Mason, Jr to discuss everything from how to create a film soundtrack, what a music producer actually does to moving to Los Angeles to what happens after saying “YES” to a project.

Harvey Mason’s work includes SING, DreamGirls, Pitch Perfect, Sparkle, and The Wiz Live!

See the full video, article, and Harvey’s bio here: First Steps In Making A Movie Soundtrack by Harvey Mason, Jr.

Happy Birthday, Tim!

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On behalf of everyone at Hollins University, I’d like to wish a very happy birthday to Tim Albaugh*, the director of the Hollins University Summer Graduate Screenwriting and Film Studies program.

For over a decade, Tim has worked tirelessly as a champion for not only the program but for every single student who joins the Hollins University family. Running a graduate program based in Virginia from the opposite end of the country in California is no easy task, and Tim does so willingly with enthusiasm, diligence, good humor, and love. Whether students are gathered in Texas, California, or Virginia, Tim has made genuine efforts to build a strong community of creatives, artists, and storytellers.

Thank you for all your hard work, encouragement, and support. Here’s to your next lap around the sun. May there be many more.

 

*Link to biography

 

Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments: What’s the Difference?

Writing requires a tremendous amount of work and that work often happens in phases. If you were to look at the first drafts of Hamilton or Harry Potter, they would look undeniably different from their final products. First, you brainstorm. Then you create outlines about your story, the characters, the plot, and every other detail imaginable. Writers do this several times in several different ways. Then they write the first of many drafts. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the difference between outlines, treatments, and scriptments and how each of them is important to the story development process.

Read the full article here: Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments, Oh My!

Taxes for Actors

Attention Actors!! Tax season is upon us. It’s never really a fun subject to discuss, but it is very important piece of the business side of being an actor. So to help, Angela Anderson at Backstage compiled a guide to filing taxes as a working actor. Yes, working as an actor and in the field of entertainment is such fun work, but there are some serious and boring aspects of it, but those serious and boring things are very important to take care of.

Read the full article here: The Actors’ Guide to Filing Taxes