Are Locations a Character?

The folks at ScreenCraft discuss the location of a screenplay and how it works as a character to a story. Films such as Fatal Attraction, The FugitiveIn the War of the Roses, and The Woodsman are used as examples to explain just how location plays a role in bringing your story to life and how it completes your story onscreen.

Read the full article here: Do Your Locations Have Character?

Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments: What’s the Difference?

Writing requires a tremendous amount of work and that work often happens in phases. If you were to look at the first drafts of Hamilton or Harry Potter, they would look undeniably different from their final products. First, you brainstorm. Then you create outlines about your story, the characters, the plot, and every other detail imaginable. Writers do this several times in several different ways. Then they write the first of many drafts. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the difference between outlines, treatments, and scriptments and how each of them is important to the story development process.

Read the full article here: Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments, Oh My!

Taxes for Actors

Attention Actors!! Tax season is upon us. It’s never really a fun subject to discuss, but it is very important piece of the business side of being an actor. So to help, Angela Anderson at Backstage compiled a guide to filing taxes as a working actor. Yes, working as an actor and in the field of entertainment is such fun work, but there are some serious and boring aspects of it, but those serious and boring things are very important to take care of.

Read the full article here: The Actors’ Guide to Filing Taxes

Thirteen Common Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

Brad Schreiber discusses thirteen common mistakes that screenwriters make, offers insight on how writers can spot those mistakes and provides advice on how to fix them.

Read full article: https://www.writersstore.com/13-things-bad-screenwriters-commonly-do/

What is Stream of Consciousness Writing?

Sarah Cool shares Overall Adventures insights on a thing called stream of consciousness writing. What it is is simply sitting down with a journal or at a computer and literally writing everything that comes through your head as it comes to you. They explain the benefits of using this technique of writing and how it can help you create the world you want in your head and on paper, but can also help you solve problems in your real world.

Full article and video here: Stream Of Consciousness Writing

*Music for Your Screenplays

Ken Miyamoto at ScreenCraft shares his thoughts on how to use music to enhance your screenplays and stories. He uses several films as examples to illustrate the power of music and how it can add that extra layer to the story for the audience.

Full article here: How to Use Music to Write Better Screenplays

 

*In other news, this is our 200th post!! Thanks for tagging along. Here’s to the next 200 🙂

Twelve Tips for Writers

Fun fact: writing is hard. Very hard. Sarah Cool shares a video from writing coach Stephanie Newell that discusses useful advice for writers. This is geared specifically towards prose and novel writers, but her advice is equally useful to screenwriters.

See full article with video here: 12 Tips For Every Writer

Screenwriters Final Draft Checklist

Ken Miyamoto from ScreenCraft provides a checklist for screenwriters to use to perfect the final drafts of their screenplays. Consider these guidelines for a well-polished and ready script for readers.

Click here for full article: The Ultimate Final Draft Checklist for Screenwriters

Writing Cards

This is arguably one of the best things I’ve ever run into. One writer did something quite clever and brilliant, instead of asking for photos with the renowned creators they met, they collected pieces of advice written on a notecard. That collection of notecards has been compiled into a website full of words or wisdom, encouragement, and necessary butt-kickings from the creators of your favorite work. Read up and get inspired. And don’t forget to eat lunch 🙂

See full website here: Their Writing Cards

Reverse Engineering Your Screenplay

Indie Film Academy provides an interesting technique for getting your screenplay finished: reverse engineering. That’s a simple way of saying work backward. This may help you get over that seemingly impossible bump in the road or give you a new way to look at the writing process. Give a whirl and see how it works for you. Happy writing!

Read full article here: Reverse Engineering Your Screenplay