9 Things Every Girl Boss Does Before 9 AM

Erin Nicole at The Zoe Report compiled a list of nine things that every “Girl Boss” does before 9 AM. Even though this article doesn’t address the film industry in the slightest, I found these morsels of wisdom worth sharing. This article could have easily been entitled “What Bosses Do Before 9 AM”. And regardless of your profession, all of these habits are worth incorporating into our daily lives.

Read full article here: 9 Things Every Girl Boss Does Before 9 AM

Storyclock Notebook: A Notebook Designed for Screenwriters

Attention Writers! Are you looking for a new notebook? Need something to help you get your story out of your head? Need help organizing your story ideas? The Storyclock Notebook could help. A recent Kickstarter campaign was created by Seth Worley to get the books launched and printed. The more you give, the more you’ll be able to get 🙂 Isn’t that awesome? You can get anything from a PDF version to several printed copies depending on how much you donate to the Kickstarter. And the best part, the books have those three beautiful words: Made in the USA. Go check it out!

Find out more here: Storyclock Notebook: A Notebook Designed for Screenwriters

Want to Be Creative on Purpose?

Since life can feel like a four-letter word with “if” in the middle at times, it can be hard to make out to-do lists for our work and home obligations and practically impossible to accomplish anything outside of that. Carl Richards with the New York Times offers some insight for creative souls on how to still be creative souls in a hectic world. Two words: schedule it.

Read the full article here: Want to Be Creative on Purpose? Schedule It.

The Other Hero’s Journey

V Renee at No Film School discusses the other hero’s journey: the journey of the writer creating the story. Included with her thoughts is the video essay Michael Tucker of Lessons from the Screenplay that discusses the creation of the film Inside Out and the challenges of bringing that story to life.

The Other Hero’s Journey: The Emotional Struggle of Screenwriting

I Needed Color

When most people think of Jim Carrey, they think of actor known for his goofy, zany roles such as Dr. Seuss’s Grinch or Ace Ventura. Well, the actor recently released a mini documentary on Vimeo that revealed a completely different side of himself and an astonishingly amazing talent: painting. The video went viral as people were amazed and surprised at the hidden artistic talent and the pearls of wisdom that he shared.

What I admired about this was not only the incredible artistic talent, but the ability of Mr. Carrey to channel whatever emotions or experiences he had – sometimes dark and painful – into something bright, beautiful, and worth sharing. Internal battles are the hardest to fight and I’m so happy that he was able to find that healthy outlet in something that created the good kind of surprise in the world, the kind of surprise that makes people smile and say “have you seen this!?” as they can’t wait to share it with the world because it is just so darn amazing.

I guess the takeaway from this is that writers can do the same thing. Use the pain, love, joy, heartache, elation, whatever, and use it to create something that the world can’t help but notice and share.

Mr. Carrey, I sincerely hope brighter days are ahead for you right now. Thank you so much for sharing your incredible talent with the world and showing people that it CAN be done. You can take whatever darkness you see, hear, and feel in the world and turn it into light. Keep shining, sir. The world appreciates your light.

Watch Full mini documentary here: Jim Carrey: I Needed Color

Lynda Obst’s No-B.S. Advice for Fighting Hollywood Gender Inequality

Producer Lynda Obst wrote an insightful guest column for Hollywood Reporter on how to fight gender inequality in the film industry. She even argues that the film industry is the best industry for women and minorities as she points out the progress that has been made over the past few years while also reminding us that we have a lot more work to do.

Read the full article here: Producer Lynda Obst’s No-B.S. Advice for Fighting Hollywood Gender Inequality (Guest Column)

The Q&A with 9 Oscar-Nominated Screenwriters

Jeff Goldsmith with ScreenCraft sat down with nine of the 2016 Oscar nominees in the Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay categories to talk about everything from the best writing advice to favorite procrastinating methods – yes, you read the correctly, as well as battling the obstacles and demons. Enjoy.

 

Full article and podcast here: The Q&A with 9 Oscar-Nominated Screenwriters

The ‘Jane Test’

Angela Watercutter at Wired magazine discusses the “Bechdel Test”, a simple three question test to gauge the level of gender bias (towards females in particular) that a film or story has. Watercutter goes a step farther and introduces what she calls the “Jane test”. The name is inspired by Natalie Portman’s character Jane Foster in the MCU’s Thor films. Following the lead of script reader and producer Ross Putnam, who began posting female character descriptions in scripts on Twitter, she adds three additional questions to consider. The point of the test is to evaluate how female characters are portrayed, not just onscreen, but on paper in the initial script so that female characters can be given the multi-dimensional qualities they deserve.

Read full article here: The “Jane” Test

“The More is Inside”… A Celebration and Discussion of Women Filmmakers

Women, veteran and new, in film industry gathered during the Sundance Film Festival to discuss women’s roles in the film industry and possibilities of what the future holds for women’s place in the world. The article also opens up an important line of discussion as far as women are concerned: we need to have each other’s backs, regardless of profession, ethnicity, religion, or self-identifiers. We need to support each other now more than ever. We need to stop competing. Yes, acknowledge the problems. Absolutely. And there are plenty of them. But let’s work together to fix them. That’s the beauty of cinema; it provides a space for all people to come to the table, contribute, and learn about/from one another so that we can leave this world better than we found it. Perhaps that’s a dose of naïveté talking, but I’m optimistic about the possibilities of what people can accomplish when we learn to work together despite our differences.

Full article here: Perspective: Celebration of women filmmakers triggers heated debate among Salma Hayek, Jessica Williams and Shirley MacLaine

Eight Black Female Directors to Watch

Codeblackreport.com curated a list of eight black female directors worthy of notice in 2017. With continued scrutiny and discussion about the lack of diversity both in front of and behind the camera, there has been a strong cultural push to include people that are, you know, not white, wealthy or male. Representation matters.

Eight Black Female Directors Making Moves in Hollywood