Advice and Inspiration from Greta Gerwig

Ken Miyamoto shares some morsels of inspiration from the brilliant mind of Greta Gerwig, the writer and director of Lady Bird. He shares her insight through a series of interviews with the actress turn writer/director. Here are a few highlights:

  • Writing Words that Don’t Look Like They’ve Been Written
  • Taking the Time to Prepare Yourself
  • Story Structure Is Embedded Within Us All
  • You Have to Take the Leap
  • Don’t Judge and Dismiss Your Own Writing
  • Listen to Your Characters
  • Treat Each Character as If They Could Have Their Own Movie About Them
  • Great Screenplays Should Be Like Poetry

Read the full article here: Screenwriting Advice From LADY BIRD Writer/Director Greta Gerwig

Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments: What’s the Difference?

Writing requires a tremendous amount of work and that work often happens in phases. If you were to look at the first drafts of Hamilton or Harry Potter, they would look undeniably different from their final products. First, you brainstorm. Then you create outlines about your story, the characters, the plot, and every other detail imaginable. Writers do this several times in several different ways. Then they write the first of many drafts. Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the difference between outlines, treatments, and scriptments and how each of them is important to the story development process.

Read the full article here: Outlines, Treatments, and Scriptments, Oh My!

Taxes for Actors

Attention Actors!! Tax season is upon us. It’s never really a fun subject to discuss, but it is very important piece of the business side of being an actor. So to help, Angela Anderson at Backstage compiled a guide to filing taxes as a working actor. Yes, working as an actor and in the field of entertainment is such fun work, but there are some serious and boring aspects of it, but those serious and boring things are very important to take care of.

Read the full article here: The Actors’ Guide to Filing Taxes

The MacGuffin

Ken Miyamoto with ScreenCraft discusses the MacGuffin, what it is, and how to properly use it to tell your story as effectively as possible. He uses films such as James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Citizen Kane to illustrate how the MacGuffin can be an effective storytelling tool and add conflict to the story.

Read the full article here: How Screenwriters Can Master the MacGuffin