The Query Letter

You’ve brainstormed a concept, you’ve outlined and rearranged, you’ve written, rewritten, and then rewritten again, and you’ve got yourself a daggum screenplay. Congratulations! First, take a second to pat yourself on the back. Everyone’s got an idea for a movie, but very few people actually finish what they start. Once you’re done being proud of yourself, that sinking feeling sets in and you ask yourself this horrifying question: “what do I do now?”

There are countless ways to “break into the business” which can somehow make it seem more difficult to accomplish. But if you’re starting from scratch, the next best step is to get your query letter together.

A query letter in today’s world is an email with a casual introduction, a killer logline, and a polite sign off. That’s it. Take a look at this helpful article from ScreenCraft about how to construct the perfect query letter.

Free Access to Great Resources

Here’s a pretty neat opportunity for anyone eager to improve their writing skills. The Script Lab is offering a weekend of free access to over 40 of Hollywood’s top screenwriters, studio executives, managers, agents, producers, and world-renowned screenwriting instructors.

The weekend of September 22-23, check out The Script Lab’s Virtual Screenwriting Summit for some pretty exclusive and potentially craft changing information. There are a lot of great resources out there to help, and it’s even better when they’re free!

 

The Power of Rejection

As screenwriters, we get rejected a lot. If you haven’t, you’re either very lucky, or very new at this. Submitting your work and having it ignored (if you’re lucky) or ripped apart (if you’re not), doesn’t have to be the end of the world. Learning from rejection is a time-honored rite of passage for all aspiring creators. Harry Potter was rejected by publishers a solid twelve times, sometimes with harsh words, before our favorite boy wizard inspired seven books, eight films, and three theme parks.

If your pitch, story, or screenplay is turned down, congratulations! You thought of something, made it, and showed it to someone else. That is something to be commended and celebrated. Use this time to pat yourself on the back for being brave, but also use it as a time to see where you went wrong. Improve your structure, take another look at the dialogue, tweak and tighten, so that when you submit it again (which you definitely will), it’ll be that much harder to turn down.

And while you may be discouraged, take heart in the fact that some of our favorite movies of all time were passed over before finding their way to the big screen. See some shocking examples here, watch Brian Grazer’s words of encouragement here, and share in the comments something you’ve learned from rejection.

Giving Feedback

I was once told that to be a good writer, you have to read twice as much as you write. To be a good screenwriter, I think the rules are the same. Reading other scripts, and especially giving constructive feedback, is a skill that will not only help other writers, but can help us find the flaws and mistakes in our own work.

For those of us who are a little timid when it comes to confrontation, telling others what we honestly think of their work can be intimidating, but don’t let it stop you. Whether someone is resistant or grateful, honesty is the best policy and a necessary step for the betterment of all screenwriters.

Here’s a concise and spot-on guide for How to Give Feedback on Someone Else’s Work without losing friends and acting like a jerk.

Any additional tips or tricks you’ve picked up? Opinions on feedback in general? Any notes about this post? Share them in the comments.

Hollins University Web Series 2018: Failure to Adult

 

Failure to Adult-Cover Photo

This summer, the students in the Hollins University Graduate Screenwriting & Film Studies video production class will release a seven-episode web series, called Failure to Adult, that was written, directed, and edited by Hollins University students. The writing took place during the spring semester prior and the filming of all seven episodes took place during the six-week summer session. It really is impressive what was accomplished in that time frame.

As a member of this class, I was incredibly excited to learn the filmmaking process from start to finish and script to screen as a new writer and filmmaker (I can say that now!). It was wonderful to learn each phase of the filmmaking process and how each phase brings its own set of challenges. We had six weeks to cast, shoot, edit, and premiere the web series. In order to do this successfully, we really had to work together and take on our own unique roles outside of rotating between the crew positions of Director, 1st Assistant Director (1st AD, the person who manages the set), Sound, Gaffer (the person in charge of the lights), props master/craft services (free food!), Director of Photography (DP), and Script Supervisor (scripty). While some of us hunted locations another corresponded with actors while somebody else organized all of our necessary information so we could all stay on the same page. It was a whirlwind of a process, but we are happy about the outcome. The coolest (and most terrifying) feeling was sitting in a room with peers and friends as we watched and laughed at the show we created. We got some strong feedback and are hopeful about how it will be received.

Feel free to check out the series and share it with people you know. It will officially launch in September on Vimeo and YouTube. Stay tuned!

Click here to see more details: Failure to Adult: Official Facebook Page

Press from NPR: Hollins Program Cranks Out Hopeful Filmmakers

Twitter: https://twitter.com/failtoadultHU

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/failuretoadulthu/ 

 

Handing Over the Reigns

All good things must come to an end, and so it is with Amanda’s tenure as the official Hollins’ Screenwriting Blogger. She is off to bigger and better things, like agonizing over her thesis and job hunting with her fancy degree. She has kindly handed off the login info to me and trusted me with her baby. Ha! Fool!

Hi, I’m Amy. And I am a filmaholic.

At this passing of the torch, I was inspired to write about giving up control of our own babies: our screenplays. Our stories and characters are often things we’ve thought about for years. We feel a strong connection and sense of ownership over the tales that we tell and the progress of our protagonists. Sometimes, we guard these stories too much and they live out their lives in a folder on our laptops, never seeing the light of day. While it’s imperative that we have such passion for our work, it’s equally as important that we learn when to let go.

Writer’s groups, thoughtful professors, or just trusted friends are all important elements to creating a good screenplay. But collaboration isn’t the only reason to share your work with a trusted critic or observer. Here are three reasons why your creative work needs an audience.

What insights have you gained by sharing your screenplay with others? Share in the comments below.

Resume Advice for Screenwriters

Jacob N. Stuart, the Founder of Screenwriting Staffing, provides advice and guidance on how to create a screenwriter’s resume. He provides “12 Overview Points” about the who, what, when, why, and how about the information your writer’s resume needs to become gainfully employed as a writer in the business.

Read the full article here: A “HOW TO” GUIDE FOR WRITING THE “SCREENWRITER’S RESUME”

Want to Act AND Write? Markus Redmond Shares His Story

The folks at Film Courage sat down with Markus Redmond to discuss his professional journey how he broke into Hollywood as both an actor and as a writer. For those incredibly ambitious folks, pin this and watch it. Enjoy 🙂

Have additional insight? Feel free to comment, discuss, and share.

See the full interview here: How I Broke Into Acting and Screenwriting in Hollywood – Markus Redmond [FULL INTERVIEW]

Scripts vs. Novels

Scott Myers discusses the difference between writing scripts and writing screenplays, and what to do when your more familiar with one but want to switch to the other. His answer: do both. He also discusses the challenges and advantages of each side of the writing spectrum.

Have thoughts about this or have additional insight on the subject? Feel free to comment and discuss in the comments 🙂

Read the full article here: Reader Question: What’s the biggest challenge novelists face when switching to screenwriting?

The Emotional Power of Cinema

Filmmaking is a collective assemblage of desires,” – Isabelle Huppert

Hillary Weston from the Criterion Collection sat down with French film legend Isabelle Huppert to discuss her career, her chemistry with other actors and how you can tell you have that chemistry, and how movies can have such an emotional power over people.

Read the full article here: Isabelle Huppert on the Emotional Power of Cinema